Our Process

We believe that great systems set a few general conditions and create the space for compelling ideas and solutions to emerge and grow on their own.

Our strategy for the design of this new system is based on two key ideas: continuously fold the learning into the design and take the time to learn from, and with, others. This means we rely heavily on collaborating and co-designing with the people the system is being designed for -- the students, families, educators, learning providers, and business and community members. Our greatest lessons and our most provocative ideas emerge from working with people to surface their best practices in supporting learners in dynamic, authentic environments.

User-Centered Design

Our goal is to seed ReSchool’s design with openness and humility by truly understanding the people the system will serve. By engaging in user-centered design with learners, families, educators and communities, we acknowledge they are the ones most suited to design the system that will best serve them. We utilize strategies such as observations, simulations and shadowing to identify gaps and unmet needs. When we engage in thoughtful prototypes with users, we can get to the heart of their needs and incorporate concepts into a new system that bring value to their lives.​

Discovery Driven Planning

We also use discovery-driven planning, which is considered a more effective way to manage highly innovative ventures in uncharted territory. More conventional strategies like backwards planning depend on past data and a predictable end product. With discovery-driven planning, we are acknowledging that a radically new venture is inherently unpredictable. Rather than relying on previously collected knowledge, we hold informed assumptions and continually test them. Discovery-driven planning is essentially the process of converting our assumptions into knowledge over time, and incorporating the new data into our plan.

"Whether inside a big organization or working on their own, most young people will be managing projects after leaving school. We need to do a better job of preparing kids for a project-based world."

Tom Vander Ark, Getting Smart